Residential: Manhattan Townhouse Addition

Project Architects: Albert Hennings, Jeffrey Orling, Jihyun Oh
Interior design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Contractor: Design Direct, Cormac Creed
Photography: Sasha Sobolyewa
Lighting fixture: Ingo Maurer

Residential: SoHo Collector's Loft

Colors: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Furniture: Ziba Khalili
Project Architect: Blanca Laki
Project Managers: Menachem Haimovich; Jimmy Sverdlin
Publication: Houses Casas Hauser (edited by Alejandro Bahamon; Konemann 2002)
Photographs: Marina Berio, Jean Christian Bourcart

Residential: Planetarium Penthouse

Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov
Project Manager: Jimmy Sverdlin

Residential: Greenwich Connecticut Estate

Project Architects: Ziba Khalili, Richard Gundlach, Isa Dello Strologo, Oleg Pavlov, Blanca Laki
Interior Design: Ziba Khalili
Project Manager: Carl Forestieri
Photographs: Gregory Lehmann (and by Alexandr Neratoff)

Residential: Manhattan Penthouse

Project Architects: Mark Wryan; Albert Hennings, Jihyun Oh
Interior design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Contractors: J.T. Magen;
Manager: Cormac Creed

Residential: Manhattan Apartment

Interior Design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov
Construction Manager: Menachem Haimovich

Residential: Upper West Side Apartment

Project Architects: Jihyun Oh
Interior design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Construction Manager: Jimmy Sverdlin
Photography: Sasha Soboleva

Residential: Upper West Side House

Construction manager: Jimmy Sverdlin
Photography: Sasha Soboleva

Residential: Beekman Pl. Townhouse

Interior Design: Charles Allem
Project Manager: Jimmy Sverdlin
Article: Steven M.L. Aronson
Photographs: Paul Warchol

Residential: Cottage in Northern Europe

Interior Design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov

Residential: SoHo Art Studio

Development: New Tribeca Building

Project Architect: Jihyun Oh, Blanca Laki
Renderings: RomCad Design

Development: SoHo Restaurant

Project architects: Jeffrey Orling, Jihyun Oh.
Renderings by ROM CAD Design

Development: Columbus Ave Loft Building Enlargement

The existing 3-story rooftop addition to a 4-story loft building built in 1900 was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1990, and has been universally characterized as “inappropriate, out-of-character, convoluted, asymmetrical and erratic.” The reconfiguration we proposed seeks to regularize the addition’s geometry, reduce its height and apparent mass, while actually enlarging the addition substantially.

The existing addition’s major problem is its large mass relative to the volume of the original 4-story building. We decided that we would break up the addition’s mass into two portions: its lower floor would be made to look like a much earlier addition to the original building typical of late 19th century, by the reconfiguration of this lower floor’s street-facing façade into a sloped-glass “artist studio-type” window.

The rest of the addition is pulled back from the brick side walls and the street façade, and is broken up into two portions – the mostly obscured lower portion will be finished in stucco, and the upper portion will be finished in lead-coated copper, so that it might be perceived as being further back than it really is.

The project was approved in 2011 and will be under construction in 2013.

Development: East Village Lofts and Townhouses

Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov

Development: Franklin Street Lofts and Townhouse

The Sugarloaf Condominium on Franklin Street: Residential conversion and enlargement of one of the largest loft conversions in Tribeca (at the time), involving the insertion of new windows into a historic façade, the addition of all new services, residential features and infrastructure, and a penthouse large enough to have so upset the politicians that a zoning text change was passed to disenfranchise my interpretation of the law.

Development: Leonard Street Lofts and Penthouse

Project Architect: Isa Dello Strologo
Department of Buildings Liaison: Janice Pittman

Development: SoHo Restoration

Project architects: Jeffrey Orling, Jihyun Oh.
Renderings by ROM CAD Design

Development: Meat Market House

Interior Design: Michael Hord
Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov
Published: Metropolitan Home (10/96)
Text: Dylan Landis; Photos: Scott Frances
Published: New York Living by Lisa Lovett Smith

Development: Tribeca Loft Conversions

Tribeca is an area of port and food storage warehouses, brick facades with smaller arched windows. 27 Leonard Street is a classic 3-window Tribeca loft building with a small penthouse and a ground-floor residential unit duplexed with a studio/office in the basement, located in the main Tribeca Historic District. 463 Greenwich Street was one of the largest tenant-sponsored residential conversions comprising six loft buildings covering an entire blockfront of northern Tribeca.

Development: SoHo Loft Conversions

SoHo is characterized by large windows designed to illuminate detailed work in their 19th century factories, and delicate cast iron facades. 55 Prince Street was a tenant-sponsored residential conversion of the former Tiffany foundry in the east SoHo area now called Nolita. 133-137 Greene Street was a residential conversion and legalization of a complex owner and tenant-occupied classic loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. 479-489 Greenwich Street (SoHo Waterfront) was a two-step conversion to residential use of a 100,000 SF warehouse building outside of the historic districts but two blocks from the Hudson River. Very substantial penthouses were added and the building underwent extensive reconfiguration to 18 very large units.

Development: East Village and LES

Loft buildings in these mainly residential districts are taller than their neighbors, offering particularly advantageous locations for penthouses. 48 Canal Street was an early conversion in the Seward park area of the Lower East Side, and one where we succeeded in getting a penthouse approved on an already oversized building; the Tompkins Park lofts took advantage of height to offer sweeping midtown views.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Tribeca Townhouse Bathroom

A rare color combination suggested by the client was something that I had always wanted to explore. The stone was Persian Golden Travertine, the blue and gold glass tiles were hand-painted Italian, and the plumbing fixtures were British Art Deco style (from Waterworks).

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Modern Bathrooms

Bathrooms often offer much design freedom as very closed spaces separate from the rest of the apartment or houses’ they serve: connections to the surrounding spaces are made by memory and do not have to be literal.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Traditional Bathrooms

Richness of design, details, materials and fixtures are what we strive for in these most personal spaces.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Special Kitchens

The minimum design gesture to fulfill a function was allowed the maximum expression by using custom fabricated components exaggerating the details. Inventive choices of materials include recycled wood beams, traditional glass, hand-forged steel, borderless terrazzo divided by larger heavier stones instead of metal edging.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Stairs and Railings

Modern railings were made from hand-wrought and hammered steel by Tovey Hallek, who had been for years Richard Serra’s shop assistant; others used cold and hot rolled steel in combination to outline functions. The railings of the Greenwich palace stair and balcony were ordered from traditional craftsmen in Lyon, France.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Doors and Hardware

Oak, steel and restoration glass pivoting doors were inspired by Mondrian paintings and early modern details; period details were recreated, traditional hardware was located, new hardware was designed and recycled materials were combined.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Floors and Ceilings

Modern floors use stone and wood in patterns to center spaces; the same effect is sought in more traditional settings, with more palatial and polished materials.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Accessories

Hand-wrought steel was used to reinvent coat hooks and curtain railings.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Furniture

A dining table, a kitchen table, a couch and wall cabinet, and an office reception area.

Limited-Scope Projects, Special Rooms and Details: Landscaping

Architectural elements are used to extend defined spaces (terraces, walled gardens, overlooks) into the portions of the landscape nearest the buildings we designed, framing more distant views

Archive: Connecticut Country House

An early project, a simple house for a Russian writer recalls some of the rural classicism of the Russian countryside, using inexpensive materials and even raw tree trunks instead of formal columns.

Archive: Tribeca Apartment

A small loft was transformed into a simple retreat for one of Tribeca’s early financial industry residents.

Archive: Music Critic's Study

One of my first projects, a retreat for a music critic and rock biographer, with the ceiling providing a mesmerizing surface to refocus the mind and increase concentration.

Archive: Upper East Side Townhouse

A traditional classic townhouse had to be recreated in an empty shell of a former house that spent years in commercial use. Portions of the façade had to be reinvented, and a small penthouse and garden were added to the 5-bedroom house.

Archive: Art Dealer's Apartment

A second-generation art dealer and a school friend gave me one of my first projects, to incorporate some important and diverse art objects into a rambling Upper East Side apartment that we remapped and renovated.

Archive: Writer's Study

The smallest project I ever did: a walk-in closet was transformed to a Hollywood biographical writer’s study by imagining the desk surface as a stage, representing a town square surrounded by stylized buildings acting as bookcases and writers supply cabinets.

Archive: Prince Street Loft

A simple speculative loft renovation within a loft building (55 Prince) that we converted.

Archive: My Own Loft in the 1980s

Before the office grew and the accumulation of life cluttered the initial open space!

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A brownstone without a core was revitalized by the addition of a dramatic new two-story high dining room offering a luminous stage for dinners accommodating 12 to 34 guests using twin satinwood tables. North-facing steel windows and doors with French balconies overlook an instant forest screening an institutional neighbor. The addition, located in an historic district, recalls an earlier period when Manhattan townhouses were extensively reconfigured, the 1920’s, sharing some of their inspiration, the private houses of early 20th century Vienna, particularly Ludwig Wittgenstein’s design work (and his hardware).

 

Project Architects: Albert Hennings, Jeffrey Orling, Jihyun Oh
Interior design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Contractor: Design Direct, Cormac Creed
Photography: Sasha Sobolyewa
Lighting fixture: Ingo Maurer

 

The apartment was also featured on CBS's Elementary in episode 10, titled Leviathan.

Residential use introduced a new human scale that had to merge with the rhythm of the 19th century garment factory, using a re-imagined door and pivoting glass transom system reminiscent of the original office partitions. Sunlight did not reach the middle of this huge loft: spaces that needed to be located at the floor’s periphery were made translucent using raw steel and natural glass doors and cabinets to activate the center space.

 

Colors: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Furniture: Ziba Khalili
Project Architect: Blanca Laki
Project Managers: Menachem Haimovich; Jimmy Sverdlin
Publication: Houses Casas Hauser (edited by Alejandro Bahamon; Konemann 2002)
Photographs: Marina Berio, Jean Christian Bourcart

 

See Kitchens and Modern Bathrooms for more images.

The top four levels of a rare Upper West Side loft building originally enlarged by the Rockwell Group were substantially rebuilt when the new owners acquired and merged the top two apartments and wanted to be transported to Majorca where they spent their honeymoon, while overlooking the tress of the Natural History Museum Park across the Avenue and Central Park beyond. We found hidden volume undiscovered by the previous architects, that yielded a two-story living room, and we developed an architectural language that recalled Spanish Medieval and Moorish elements to pull together the diverse levels and circulation patterns of this complex townhouse-in-the-sky.

Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov
Project Manager: Jimmy Sverdlin

See Kitchens for more images

What would Claude Ledoux or Giacomo Quarenghi (a classical 19th c. St. Petersburg architect) build if they were summoned to Greenwich, Connecticut? The goal was to build as authentic as an early 19-century palace as could be accomplished with modern technology without producing a pastiche of styles we used to call a “McMansion.” The result was called one of Greenwich’s “Great Estates,” a 20,000 SF formal country house with a 2-story ballroom, living, dining, library, family room, eat-in kitchen, 5 bedrooms, an entertainment area with bar, home theatre, billiard room, and a sports facility including an indoor pool, whirlpool, sauna, steam room and gym. The public rooms were furnished with French, Italian and Russian 18th and 19th century pieces collected on two continents.

 

Project Architects: Ziba Khalili, Richard Gundlach, Isa Dello Strologo, Oleg Pavlov, Blanca Laki
Interior Design: Ziba Khalili
Project Manager: Carl Forestieri
Photographs: Gregory Lehmann (and by Alexandr Neratoff)

Reconfiguration of I.M. Pei’s only apartment design to convert it from a 2-bedroom pied-a-terre into a 4-bedroom part-time family home by overlaying a level of tactile details, warm and natural materials, cultural references and three-dimensionality onto a superbly detailed but cold and a-spatial gray granite showplace. A family kitchen was squeezed into the space in and around what used to be a bar, and furniture, cabinetwork and glass doors were added to offer flexibility in compartmentalizing functions when necessary.

 

Project Architects: Mark Wryan; Albert Hennings, Jihyun Oh
Interior design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Contractors: J.T. Magen;
Manager: Cormac Creed

Every detail and element of style we added to the merger of two apartments into an imagined reconstitution of a grand pre-war apartment had to be derived from (or literally re-use pieces of) the early Art Deco building they were in, or from its modernist roots. A public sphere of circulation was created around an imposing gallery separated from the private outer rooms by pivoting glass and steel doors derived from Mondrian paintings, the private rooms also connected by a separate circulation pattern in a peripheral enfilade. A custom silk and wool rug related the surrounding architectural elements in a bar-code pattern focused on a square of long-strand green fibers, the lawn at the apartment entrance door.

 

Interior Design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov
Construction Manager: Menachem Haimovich

 

See Kitchens, Modern Bathrooms, and Doors for more images.

Coffered ceilings were introduced into an apartment on a bedroom floor of a former very grand double townhouse to increase the total height to what would have been expected on a parlor floor, taking advantage of unusual steel beam and slab framing discovered during the initial probes. Taking a cue from the original house’s windows, the kitchen became translucent, open or closed depending on where one was in the living area, its corner eroded by the desire to maximize the living and dining room’s perceived dimensions.

 

Project Architects: Jihyun Oh
Interior design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Construction Manager: Jimmy Sverdlin
Photography: Sasha Soboleva

Three upper-floor apartments in a partially-preserved former Victorian brownstone were merged into a triplex, and a family room penthouse was added, tucked-in behind a tall cornice and attic space to be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. A modern central-kitchen configuration was imposed onto what used to be the house’s library floor, with the original pieces of the woodwork that survived around the windows duplicated and recombined to define the new more open modern spaces.

 

Construction manager: Jimmy Sverdlin
Photography: Sasha Soboleva

The art collector’s apartment by minimalist master John Pawson was devoid of air conditioning or, curiously, much lighting. It needed to become a home: we gave it light, warmth (and cooling) and the new owner’s somewhat neo-classical mid-century style which surprisingly was not incompatible with the modern bones of Pawson’s design.

 

Interior Design: Charles Allem
Project Manager: Jimmy Sverdlin
Article: Steven M.L. Aronson
Photographs: Paul Warchol

19th Century gardener’s cottage restored in a free-interpretation of a local craftsman style, expanded by a sun-room getting the most from the luminosity of the cloudy northern sky and offering serene vistas of the verdant landscape and the surrounding new stone walls, firewood and mechanical houses and wood-deck terraces built by a local mason-artist.

 

Interior Design: Jane Krupp Ltd.
Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov

 

See Traditional Bathrooms for more images.

The top floor SoHo loft had exquisite and perfectly preserved finishes on its floors, columns and walls, and the renovation that added a mezzanine, specialized rooms and a cascade “stairway to the sky” to the roof terrace, was tasked to leave the finishes undisturbed, and to use methods and details that would have been used when such lofts became art studios in the 1960’s and 1970’s – exposed electrical conduit, surface-mounted piping, simple hardware, railings, appliances and track lighting.

Project Architect: Jihyun Oh, Blanca Laki
Renderings: RomCad Design

Project architects: Jeffrey Orling, Jihyun Oh.
Renderings by ROM CAD Design

The existing 3-story rooftop addition to a 4-story loft building built in 1900 was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1990, and has been universally characterized as “inappropriate, out-of-character, convoluted, asymmetrical and erratic.” The reconfiguration we proposed seeks to regularize the addition’s geometry, reduce its height and apparent mass, while actually enlarging the addition substantially.

The existing addition’s major problem is its large mass relative to the volume of the original 4-story building. We decided that we would break up the addition’s mass into two portions: its lower floor would be made to look like a much earlier addition to the original building typical of late 19th century, by the reconfiguration of this lower floor’s street-facing façade into a sloped-glass “artist studio-type” window.

The rest of the addition is pulled back from the brick side walls and the street façade, and is broken up into two portions – the mostly obscured lower portion will be finished in stucco, and the upper portion will be finished in lead-coated copper, so that it might be perceived as being further back than it really is.

The project was approved in 2011 and will be under construction in 2013.

Carriage House - 211-213 East 2nd Street: Residential conversion, substantial reconstruction and minor enlargement of a 6-story loft building (former stable and carriage house) abandoned since the 1940’s, creating 6 residential apartments ranging from flats to duplex and triplex units; and the construction of a new 7-level modern annex structure sharing most of its infrastructure with the loft building, and yielding two stacked townhouse-style units (triplex and quadruplex) and a garage, expressing on its façade the changing historic scales of the neighborhood.

 

Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov

The Sugarloaf Condominium on Franklin Street: Residential conversion and enlargement of one of the largest loft conversions in Tribeca (at the time), involving the insertion of new windows into a historic façade, the addition of all new services, residential features and infrastructure, and a penthouse large enough to have so upset the politicians that a zoning text change was passed to disenfranchise my interpretation of the law.

Tribeca Townhouse (at Franklin Street): An existing 1-story shell turned out to have been the remaining floor of the decapitated three-story home of the former first private fire company in New York City (created by the Washington Market association who felt they were too far from the city’s official fire companies). This was a reconstruction from photographs of a piece of city history that would have otherwise been lost.

The building was ideally suited for 3-story townhouse use, and had recently been leased for a few months to a famous former international banking official reluctantly living in New York while under investigation for a scandalous encounter.

A typical limestone-front 19th century factory building outside of the historic district was found to be eligible by a fraction of an inch for an unusual interpretation of zoning rules, extending a higher development potential to the entire site. This yielded a substantial 2-level penthouse, much more than the expected volume, with massing reminiscent of the wedding cake silhouettes of later apartment houses.

 

Project Architect: Isa Dello Strologo
Department of Buildings Liaison: Janice Pittman

The renovation of the 1st and basement levels of this central SoHo building’s façade had to choose which part of its history should be memorialized: the building started off as a single-family Federal-style house; after the area went through a red-light district phase, the building was enlarged in all directions including forward to the street line incorporating an elevator between the old and the new facades – the façade that is now visible above the 1st floor. The storefront that was part of that mid-19th c. enlargement was further modified in the 1920’s. Ultimately, we chose (and the landmarks Preservation Commission approved) to restore the storefront and stair as they appeared in the 1920’s, largely following the initial commercial configuration but with some style and material choices that we know were made later (such as the use of glass block and steel frames).

 

Project architects: Jeffrey Orling, Jihyun Oh.
Renderings by ROM CAD Design

An abandoned sausage factory was transformed to a theatrical house, movie set and party space incorporating the new owner’s considerable collection of architectural antiques. Light was let into the space’s windowless core by carving out a light court and allowing a salvaged staircase to wind its way up to the roof penthouse.

 

Interior Design: Michael Hord
Project Architect: Oleg Pavlov
Published: Metropolitan Home (10/96)
Text: Dylan Landis; Photos: Scott Frances
Published: New York Living by Lisa Lovett Smith

Tribeca is an area of port and food storage warehouses, brick facades with smaller arched windows. 27 Leonard Street is a classic 3-window Tribeca loft building with a small penthouse and a ground-floor residential unit duplexed with a studio/office in the basement, located in the main Tribeca Historic District. 463 Greenwich Street was one of the largest tenant-sponsored residential conversions comprising six loft buildings covering an entire blockfront of northern Tribeca.

33 Warren Street is a rare and early marble-front loft building, located in a high-development potential zone but was subject to historic zone limitations as it was declared a landmark. The challenge was to obtain Landmarks Preservation Commission approval for a 3-story penthouse addition while converting the building to residential use. Any addition would have been visible from only two very specific vantage points: we used a mansard-type structure set back at every level, so that it was totally hidden from the distant west vantage point, and appeared to be only a single floor of lead-roofed dormers as viewed from Church Street.

SoHo is characterized by large windows designed to illuminate detailed work in their 19th century factories, and delicate cast iron facades. 55 Prince Street was a tenant-sponsored residential conversion of the former Tiffany foundry in the east SoHo area now called Nolita. 133-137 Greene Street was a residential conversion and legalization of a complex owner and tenant-occupied classic loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. 479-489 Greenwich Street (SoHo Waterfront) was a two-step conversion to residential use of a 100,000 SF warehouse building outside of the historic districts but two blocks from the Hudson River. Very substantial penthouses were added and the building underwent extensive reconfiguration to 18 very large units.

Loft buildings in these mainly residential districts are taller than their neighbors, offering particularly advantageous locations for penthouses. 48 Canal Street was an early conversion in the Seward park area of the Lower East Side, and one where we succeeded in getting a penthouse approved on an already oversized building; the Tompkins Park lofts took advantage of height to offer sweeping midtown views.

A rare color combination suggested by the client was something that I had always wanted to explore. The stone was Persian Golden Travertine, the blue and gold glass tiles were hand-painted Italian, and the plumbing fixtures were British Art Deco style (from Waterworks).

Bathrooms often offer much design freedom as very closed spaces separate from the rest of the apartment or houses’ they serve: connections to the surrounding spaces are made by memory and do not have to be literal.

Richness of design, details, materials and fixtures are what we strive for in these most personal spaces.

The minimum design gesture to fulfill a function was allowed the maximum expression by using custom fabricated components exaggerating the details. Inventive choices of materials include recycled wood beams, traditional glass, hand-forged steel, borderless terrazzo divided by larger heavier stones instead of metal edging.

Modern railings were made from hand-wrought and hammered steel by Tovey Hallek, who had been for years Richard Serra’s shop assistant; others used cold and hot rolled steel in combination to outline functions. The railings of the Greenwich palace stair and balcony were ordered from traditional craftsmen in Lyon, France.

Oak, steel and restoration glass pivoting doors were inspired by Mondrian paintings and early modern details; period details were recreated, traditional hardware was located, new hardware was designed and recycled materials were combined.

Modern floors use stone and wood in patterns to center spaces; the same effect is sought in more traditional settings, with more palatial and polished materials.

Hand-wrought steel was used to reinvent coat hooks and curtain railings.

A dining table, a kitchen table, a couch and wall cabinet, and an office reception area.

Architectural elements are used to extend defined spaces (terraces, walled gardens, overlooks) into the portions of the landscape nearest the buildings we designed, framing more distant views

An early project, a simple house for a Russian writer recalls some of the rural classicism of the Russian countryside, using inexpensive materials and even raw tree trunks instead of formal columns.

A small loft was transformed into a simple retreat for one of Tribeca’s early financial industry residents.

One of my first projects, a retreat for a music critic and rock biographer, with the ceiling providing a mesmerizing surface to refocus the mind and increase concentration.

A traditional classic townhouse had to be recreated in an empty shell of a former house that spent years in commercial use. Portions of the façade had to be reinvented, and a small penthouse and garden were added to the 5-bedroom house.

A second-generation art dealer and a school friend gave me one of my first projects, to incorporate some important and diverse art objects into a rambling Upper East Side apartment that we remapped and renovated.

The smallest project I ever did: a walk-in closet was transformed to a Hollywood biographical writer’s study by imagining the desk surface as a stage, representing a town square surrounded by stylized buildings acting as bookcases and writers supply cabinets.

A simple speculative loft renovation within a loft building (55 Prince) that we converted.

Before the office grew and the accumulation of life cluttered the initial open space!